Halsway Manor’s Golden Garden for our 50th Anniversary by Bonny Sartin

sleepers 002In the early summer Maureen and Graham Knight asked me to help create a Golden Garden for the 50th anniversary of the forming of Halsway Manor Society and the purchase of the Manor. This sounded like a very positive project and if there’s one thing I enjoy its a very positive project. Maureen and Graham have their work cut out looking after the garden so I thought a little assistance would not come amiss.

dancers 005The plot allocated was the one in front of the Summerhouse which hadn’t been dug over for years. When we went to attack it we quickly discarded forks and spades and got the pick axes out. It was, ‘As hard as hells bells’, as father used to say. The water was not soaking in at all but just running off the top and in the first few days we only found one lonely worm. However, as we progressed and the piles of rubbish, roots and stumps grew, people began to take an interest in our activities and stop for a chat. We found that they were very enthusiastic about the Golden Garden and with their support, our ambitions and the size of the plot seemed to grow and grow. During the summer I bumped into some friends from Coventry. I told them what we were about and when they came to the Big Sing weekend in October they brought a bag of compost with them. Brilliant!!!

2013 summer wendy house 002My sister-in-law made us two golden folk dancing figures and these were installed at the end of September, just before the A.G.M. They make a great centre piece and, so far, have stood up to all the storms that mother nature has thrown at them.

We received a donation, which paid for some solid oak sleepers to put around the edge of the garden and Graham and I heaved these into place in the middle of October. Just behind them we have planted hundreds of daffodils which Maureen and Graham have saved from other parts of the garden. We have also put in some Winter Aconites so there should be some gold showing as early as January.

sleepers 008The main planting will take place in the Spring of 2014. Many of the people staying at Halsway seem to be keen gardeners and we have already been given a lot of advice and promised a variety of plants. Two big and potentially expensive jobs need to be done too; taking a couple of branches of the beech tree and re-thatching the summerhouse, but I can see filling the plot with flowers is going to be relatively cheap. Incidentally with the breaking up of the soil the worms are coming back so we must be doing something right.

If you are interested in helping Maureen and Graham to keep the garden under control they are organising Garden Working Days on the 13th and 20th of December.

Bonny Sartin

 

 

The Halsway Shop – Full to the brim and run by fabulous volunteers.

This week we thought we would tell you a bit about the shop that we run at Halsway Manor. The shop is run by volunteers who open it during each event and all profits from the shop go directly into raising funds for Halsway. 

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The majority of our stock is sourced locally or made by a team of volunteers who meet on Tuesdays to craft and produce jewellery, sew, knit. There is a large variety of items for sale in the shop, including essentials such as toothbrushes, brushes, combs, nail files and flannels for those that have forgotten to pack them! We also sell promotional items like sweatshirts, polo shirts, pens, melamine table mats, hand crafted chopping boards, coasters, canvas bags and mugs. We have a fabulous selection of jars from locally produced Honey in Wiviliscombe and jams, marmalades and pickles from Mrs Mops, in Carhampton.

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Our wonderful volunteers make hand painted silk scarves, ties and evening bags and as well as great stocking fillers like socks with musical designs. We have postcards of Halsway and the surrounding area too as well as maps, so there is no excuse not to write home or indeed to get lost as you explore the local area!

The shop also stocks the William Winter Tune book, The Ruth Tongue songs and stories, the Halsway wall hanging and the history of Halsway, all of which have been published by Halsway Manor.

We have recently purchased some lovely little jute bags that can be filled with your choice of jars, such as  jams and pickles. These make a great present at any time of the year, but with Christmas coming up, they would make a wonderful gift to loved ones as you return from your trip, a hostess present or a gorgeous present for under the tree. 

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The shop is open when we have events on, though it is possible to purchase items at other times. Please see Viv, our events and bookings manager if you wish to purchase something out of hours, or you missed the opening of the shop, because you were too busy having fun!

The Kennedy Grant Library at Halsway Manor by Cynthia and Bonnie Sartin

This week we are delighted to have guest bloggers Cynthia and Bonnie Sartin talking about the work that goes on behind the scenes in our Kennedy Grant Library At Halsway Manor which houses a huge collection of mixed media folk treasures – over to the Sartins…

HalswayManorLibrary (9 of 13)After 15 years of slogging away the 4,000 books and 2,000 records, CDs and tapes in the collection are catalogued, listed and key worded on the computer and accessible. We still have a couple of hundred LPs, about 100 CDs and the archives to sort but we’ll get there. Having said that we are continually receiving donations of CDs and other material from generous performers and visitors to the Manor so the work will carry on even when the final recordings from the Peter Kennedy collection have been added. We are happy to accept any folk related books etc. on the understanding that if we have copies already we will sell any extra ones to raise money for the library. Back copies of EFDSS Journals and Magazines regularly crop up in boxes left for us so we have a good supply of these for sale. By re-cycling these items the library is self-financing. Recently these funds have enabled us to purchase a new computer, a wonderful oak table to put it on and a top quality CD player.  

A lot of interest has been shown recently by people wanting to do research, which is very gratifying. At the ‘Give Voice’ weekend in October we were able to show the residents around the library stock and how to use the computer to find songs etc. This worked well and we were able to help in finding new material for people to sing.

HalswayManorLibrary (3 of 13)The library has provided material for several publications. The William Winter Tune Book and Songs & Stories of Ruth Tongue. Both were local characters; William a fine fiddle player from the 19th century and Ruth a self-styled folklorist and song writer who used to come to Halsway soon after it opened in the mid 1960s. We have also assisted authors writing books about John Short (Yankee Jack the shanty man from Watchet), Charles Marson (who helped Cecil Sharp with his song collecting in Somerset) and the tradition of the Ashen Faggot. Mary Rhodes is now Halsway’s official archivist and she and Cynthia are searching for material to include in a publication that celebrates the activities at the Manor since it opened as a Folk Centre in 1965.

HalswayManorLibrary (8 of 13)The collection covers a wide spectrum of folk-related material. Song, dance, music folklore and storytelling and tutors for many instruments as well as clog, sword and morris dancing. We have noticed that people come in and immediately panic when they see a library but it is very easy to use if you keep a cool head. There are printed catalogues for people who aren’t up to speed with computers but for those who are happy with modern technology a simplified catalogue is also available on the web at www.halswaymanor.org 

HalswayManorLibrary (4 of 13)If you would like more information on the library or would like to make an appointment to book some time in for doing some research, then please contact Viv on office@halswaymanor.org.uk

Cynthia & Bonny Sartin

A lovely bit of feedback!

There is nothing quite like receiving a card or a letter these days – there is still something so much more personal about handwritten notes, than an email – especially when it contains some great feedback!

We received this letter a few weeks back and the only reason for not posting (technically) it sooner, was that we wanted to write to the author to ask permission to use it… so what did we do? We sent them an email…There is just no stopping the flow of process – nor should we – but I can’t help but feel the difference between the two types of media, even if for speed it was more valid to use email. However – I digress and snail versus email is definitely a discussion for another day – either way, we were happily given permission to share so here it is…

Dear Viv,

I am enclosing the voucher for our booking for the next storytelling weekend, next year – I enjoyed the storytelling weekend so much, it was the 4th time I had come and I can’t wait for the next one. The events are very well organised and so much is fitted in, the tutors are excellent!

I am always sorry when it is time to leave, Halsway Manor is a beautiful place and all the staff make you so welcome. The meals are marvellous and I would like to thank everyone concerned for making it so special.

Best wishes

Valerie Marchant

So – there we have it! Another satisfied customer! It puts such smiles on all our faces and is so fabulous for morale when people write and tell us how much they enjoy coming to Halsway – it makes all the hard work so worthwhile. So, many thanks to Valerie for putting pen to paper and letting us share (in) her appreciation! Halsway is a wonderful place, but it wouldn’t be the same without all the wonderful people that come to visit.

Here’s to more special moments, special events and special people at Halsway Manor.

Don’t forget that if you would like to give us feedback, positive or otherwise, please do write to Paul James, CEO@halswaymanor.org.uk

From Bagpipes to Nyckelharpa – an instrumental journey

Vicki_Pipes3Our guest blogger this week is Vicky Swan who tells us of her own personal journey in learning, playing and discovering these wonderful, yet quite different instruments. Over to Vicky…

These two instruments might seem poles apart and in many respects they are, so how did I get to become a player of both? My Dad was piper and entertainments manager at a hotel up in Scotland one year, where he met a Swedish lass on holiday – the rest as they say is history. As my Dad was a piper, the pipes naturally came first. He was an excellent teacher and ran the Brentwood School of Piping, which was later to become a full-blown competition pipe band. I like to think that I got my pedagogical background from him; his mother and sister were also both teachers. I tried at many different times to take up the Highland Pipes, but they just weren’t quite right for me, so when I discovered the Scottish smallpipes I was instantly away. Unfortunately my Dad died quite early on in my piping career, but I know he’d be proud of what I’ve done. I’m sure we’d have had many discussions on style and grace notes. He would definitely be proud of the teaching work I did for my Masters degree in Education and the subsequent tutor that I wrote.

quartet1Having spent several years teaching students with no face-to-face interaction as a teacher on-line I decided to put myself back in the position of being a learner with no teacher of my own. What better instrument to choose in the UK but the nyckelharpa. Being half Swedish I had the advantage that I’ve always known about this stunning instrument and I could speak the language and was able to get hold of one. It was a major turning point in my life. I discovered that I could never really be a beginner again, I have too much ‘prior learning’ and too many ‘transferable skills’ to eve really be a beginner. Initially it was just an instrument I could sing and play with but gradually it has taken over my life.

quartet1With my Swedish connections I do as much as I can to bring instruments into the country and unite them with new owners. I have a little stash of instruments that I can let people use to see if they like the instrument. It’s not likely that anyone wouldn’t want to take it up, but it can be a big outlay for an instrument you’ve never tried. Not everyone can take the risk I took of ordering one before I’d really seen one properly live (at the Swedish Church in London as a small child doesn’t really count).
My leap of faith paid off but if it hadn’t I’d have had no difficulty in selling it on as nyckelharpas are like gold dust! Of course I haven’t forgotten about the pipes and since taking up the nyckelharpa I’ve added English borderpipes and Swedish bagpipes to my collection. It’s a lot of up keep, practicing all these different instruments but luckily I love playing and it’s really not such a hardship. The only problem is deciding what instrument to play first!

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Vicky will be running a Nyckelharpa Workshop Weekend on 1st to 3rd November at Halsway, and a Scottish smallpipes workshop weekend 29th November to 1st December.

If you would like further information please contact vicki@swan-dyer.co.uk or to book, please email office@halswaymanor.org.uk.

A Playford Dance for you

English: English music publisher John Playford...

In honour of the Playford Liberation Front returning to Halsway Manor this past weekend! What an incredible weekend we had. Many thanks to everyone who came and especially to everyone who turned up and danced on Saturday night and of course to the brilliant PLF themselves! 

I am very grateful to Filip of the Marche who has typed up all of this fabulous information from The English Dancing Master 1651. Please do not print and distribute for profit… this is for information and enjoyment only.

What I love about this is that he has copied it directly, leaving all spellings and grammar the same as it was, with no corrections… this is simply the introduction – with one dance! If you would like to see more, you should go to his website. http://www.contrib.andrew.cmu.edu/~flip/contrib/dance/playford.html#Playford_81

The English Dancing Master:
OR,Plaine and easie Rules for the Dancing of Country Dances, with the Tune to each Dance.
Facsimile of original cover
LONDON
Printed by Thomas Harper, and are to be sold by John Playford, at his Shop in the Inner Temple neer the Church doore.  1651.
To the Ingenious Reader. The Art of Dancing called by the Ancient Greeks Orchestice, and Orchestis, is a commendable and rare Quality fit for yong Gentlemen, if opportunely and civilly used. And Plato, that Famous Philosopher thought it meet, that yong Ingenious Children be taught to dance. It is a quality that has been formerly honoured in the Courts of Princes, when performed by the most Noble Heroes of the Times! The Gentlemen of the Innes of Court, whose sweet and ayry Activitity has crowned their Grand Solemnities with Admiration to all Spectatores. This Art has been Anciently handled by AthenæusJulius Pollux,Cælius Rhodiginus, and others, and much commend it to be Excellent for Recreation, after more serious Studies, making the body active and strong, gracefull in deportment, and a quality very much beseeming a Gentleman. Yet all this should not have been an Incitement to me for Publication of this Worke (knowing these Times and the Nature of it do not agree,)But that there was a false and surrepticious Copy at the Printing Presse, which if it had been published, would have been a disparagement to the quality and the Professors thereof, and a hinderance to the Learner : Therefore for prevention of all which, having an Excellent Copy by me, and the assistance of a knowing Friend; I have ventured to put forth this ensuing Worke to the view, and gentle censure of all ingenious Gentlemen lovers of this Quallity ; not doubting but their goodnes will pardon what may be amisse and accept of the honest Intention of him that is a faithfull honourer of your Virtues, and                                        Your Servant to command,                                                       J. P.

Dull Sir John A square Dance for eight thus:

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playford dance txtDon’t forget that if you would like to join us, we are dancing Playford on Saturday 20th July  at 8pm. This is the saturday in the middle of the workshop, and it is open to non workshop attendees. If you would like to learn more about John Playford and the English Dance Master dances, then there are still a few spaces left – so make sure you give the office a call and see if we might be able to accommodate you.
Please visit our website for further information. http://www.halswaymanor.org.uk

“A contra dance is like an amusement park ride we make for ourselves.” –Unknown

One of the things I love about my job is that I often learn about things I never thought I would ever even come across or have the opportunity to know about – or know that I already know a bit about…(this could get confusing!) One of these things is American Contra Dance, but as we will very soon be welcoming some real Americans (yes, you heard me correctly, REAL Americans) to Halsway Manor for the American Contra Dance Weekend, I thought I had better brush up on my skills – not so much my skills, but more my knowledge of contra-dance. It won’t do to know nothing and whilst I am brushing up on my knowledge, I thought you might like to know a bit about it as well… Most of it has been gained from various parts of the internet, including but not exclusively Wikipedia  so please feel free to correct me if I have got something wrong. I will remove erroneous content immediately, or better still, hope that it might generate some fresh discussion.

My favourite definition of American Contra Dance is this: ‘Contra dancing is social interaction, meeting people, and making new friends, set to music‘. I could very well end this blog right here, after all, what more could we possibly want? That definition came from the Santa Barbara Contra Dance Society where they encourage you to simply find a place that does Contra Dancing, go there, see what they do, join in, have fun, meet new people, and then come back and read the rest of their definition as they warn that there is danger in simply reading the definition and making up your mind from that, about whether you will enjoy it or not! I think it is a great definition as in the same way, that is exactly what a Ceilidh or folk dance is. It is all about the dancing and making new friends and about family, community and connecting.

For a more in depth definition of Contra Dance I have come up with this, taken from a variety of sites. Let’s start with the history of Contra  Dance. At the end of the 17th century, English country dances were taken up by French dancers creating a mix of choreographies from around this period that use both English country dance steps and French court dance steps. The French called these dances contra-dance or contredanse. Over time the English hybrid dances spread to far away colonies and took the French form of the name  which later came to be associated mostly with American folk dances, especially in New England now often referred to as either Contra Dance or New England Folk dance.

Contra dances were fashionable in the United States until the early to mid-19th century, until the square dances took over, though these apparently only lasted til the late 19th century when they became passée and were no longer de riguer(lots of french going on here today!), though the tradition was kept up in some rural areas. It was not until around 1930’s and 40’s  that Contra Dances appeared in small towns and widely scattered parts of North east North America such as Ohio and northern New England, though the tradition was not revived properly until the 50’s and 60’s – according to Wiki!

So what actually happens at a Contra Dance? This is for all you guys out there that could, would, maybe could, might like (and should definitely) give it ago at some point, so that when you do, you might feel a little more at ease about what will happen…

According to the Boise Contra Dance Society, Contra uses many of the same traditional moves found in square dancing and sometimes if you go to a Contra Dance, you might even get to do a bit of square dancing too. There are about 8 basic moves, and 10 advanced moves. So with only 12 basic moves, learning contra dance is as simple as walking and smiling; Yet the near-infinite arrangements provide challenge and variety for even the most experienced of dancers. Additionally, the caller walks through each dance prior to starting up the music, and then provides helpful prompts while the band is playing. I am not sure if this youtube will help or hinder – all I can say is they look like they are having a lot of fun!

According to the Santa Barbara Contra Dance Society: ‘The caller, usually working with a group of live musicians, guides new and experienced dancers alike through a variety of dances. A dancer and his or her partner dance a series of figures, or moves, with each other and with another couple for a short time. They then repeat the same figures with another couple, and so on. The caller teaches each dance before it is actually done to the music. This gives everyone an idea of what to expect so the movements can be easily executed. The caller leads the dances while they are being done to music, so dancers are able to perform each movement to the music. Once the dancers appear (I like the choice of the word APPEAR, here, as I for one, might not even APPEAR) to have mastered a particular dance, the caller may stop calling, leaving the dancers to enjoy the movement with music alone’.

What I have deemed from my research is that people of all ages and lifestyles, including children, are welcome to the dances. There doesn’t seem to be any discrimination and people from all walks of life are encouraged to come together and make friends. There is no alcohol or smoking allowed at most places as it is all about the music, the socialising and the dancing and often children as young as 7 can join in.

There seems to be quite a few names for the Contra Dance and including the following: Contra Dance, an Old-Time Contra Dance, an Old-Time Country Dance, a Barn Dance, or similar. Most contra dance events will include a few dances of other kinds: traditional squares, waltz, polka, swing and other types of couple dances as well. When I think of Contra or a Barn Dance I always think of the film Seven Brides for Seven Brothers and the barn dance they had in that… it did not end that well, but the choreography was incredible!

And just because I can’t resist, here is the youtube video of that dance from one of my most favourite films…– don’t worry though you will not be expected to be able to perform like this! There is not much Contra Dance going on here!

One of the most amusing things I have learnt is that Contra Dancers make eye contact whenever possible, as it adds to the connecting between people and that of the dance and also helps to reduce dizziness during the swing! Some people may find it a little uncomfortable, but here is a good piece of advice from Santa Barbara on why you should give eye contact a try:You might get used to it and even like it. Remember: they’re gazing into your eyes not because they love you but because they want to make the connection, and they don’t want to throw up on you!’. Wise words indeed. 

I mustn’t of course leave out the musical aspect…

The most common contra dance repertoire is rooted in the Anglo-Celtic tradition as it developed in North America. IrishScottish,French Canadian, and Old-time tunes are common. I have also heard that some sometimes the musicians play Bluegrass. Tunes used for a contra dance are nearly always “square” 64-beat tunes and until the 1970s it was traditional to play a single tune for the duration of a contra dance (about 5 to 10 minutes). Since then, contra dance musicians have typically played tunes in sets of two or three related (and sometimes contrasting) tunes.

And here’s a bit of interesting Wiki fact for you – ‘In recent years, younger contra dancers have begun establishing “crossover contra” or “techno contra” – contra dancing to techno, hip-hop, and other modern forms of music. While challenging for DJs and callers, the fusion of contra patterns with moves from hip-hop, tango, and other forms of dance has made this form of contra dance a rising trend since 2008; it has become especially prevalent in Asheville, NC, but regular techno contra dance series are spreading up the East Coast to locales such as Charlottesville, VA, Washington, DC, Amherst, MA, and Greenfield, MA, with one-time or annual events cropping up in locations further West, including California and Washington state.’

I wonder if that will ever spread to Halsway Manor, Somerset…I’m already liking the idea of a techno-ceilidh or techno-contra fusion… very 21st Century!! In the meantime, we are very much looking forward to a wonderful week of contra dancing with an all-star line-up from the USA of caller Sue Rosen with Bruce Rosen on piano and George Wilson on fiddle, from 20th to 25th May 2013. The week is hosted by Meg Winters who helps everyone to feel at home, the mornings are for dance and music workshops, the afternoons are free to explore West Somerset and the Quantocks, the evenings are for dancing!

Don’t forget that this is a very popular event and not one that happens very often, so make sure you book early to avoid disappointment!

Christina At Halsway